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arts | causes | music | slavery & human trafficking

Breaking silences: musician Chloe Flower

Classical pianist Chloe Flower has taken Sergei Rachmaninoff’s “Prelude in G Minor,” and with the help of producers that include the legendary Babyface (aka Kenny Edmonds), arranged it as a hip-hop instrumental. That’s right, classical crossover into hip-hop. Her new single is called “Revolution,” and Flower certainly hopes she’s on to something big, a musical revolution which could bring classical music closer to the mainstream. But that’s just part of the story.

Don’t miss Chloe Flower giving an exclusive live performance of “Revolution” for The Lamp Project.

Flower is donating 100% of her proceeds to the Somaly Mam Foundation to combat sexual slavery and human trafficking. Millions of people around the world are sold into slavery each year; girls enslaved in brothels can be as young as three. Three years old. Chloe Flower stumbled upon the global sex trade as a happy tourist in Cambodia, lazily choosing to skip her plane flight and stay put in Siem Reap a while longer. When the plane she would have boarded crashed and all aboard died, she decided she was here for a reason. She rented a bike, and in riding around the area she came across what looked like brothels. She began researching the issue and found Somaly Mam, survivor of sexual slavery and already the founder of AFESIP, who would soon launch a U.S.-based organization to broaden awareness of and support for efforts to end these atrocities. That new organization would be The Somaly Mam Foundation, and Flower has been a staunch supporter of it—and a friend of Somaly Mam’s—ever since.

And so, deeply rooted in this awareness of a horrendous global criminal enterprise and her long-time involvement in efforts to eradicate it, Flower’s song, “Revolution,” together with the coming album of which it is a part, tells the story of Somaly Mam’s own personal revolution, overthrowing the torturous events of her youth to become the saviour of so many girls and women trapped on that same dark path. And it speaks of her hope for a larger revolution against the people and forces that enable and perpetuate human trafficking worldwide. Flower acknowledges that it’s a difficult topic to bring up in a conversation at work or with friends, and hopes her music starts those conversations and contributes to awareness.

Please, enjoy this interview with Chloe Flower by filmmaker Dalton Gaudin. You’ll hear more about her and about the Somaly Mam Foundation, and you’ll get to hear some of her fantastic piano playing. Find more in the exclusive live performance Flower gave for The Lamp Project. And if this cause moves you, remember that you have the power to help. Please follow the links below to visit the SMF, donate, or volunteer. Share our interview, or share what you learn about human trafficking. Or buy Flower’s music, and your money will benefit a tremendous cause while supporting an artist who has stood by that cause for years.

VISIT
Chloe Flower’s site
BUY
Chloe Flower’s music
VISIT
the Somaly Mam Foundation
DONATE to
the Somaly Mam Foundation
VOLUNTEER with
the Somaly Mam Foundation

CREDITS

Felix Lau music editor
Brandon Proulx sound editor / re-recording mixer
Jeremy Scott Olsen sound supervisor

Jason E. Johnson editor

Dalton Gaudin director / director of photography

Dalton Gaudin interview written and conducted by

Lauren Thorne producer
Ryan Metcalf supervising producer
Jeremy Scott Olsen executive producer

Hayley Welgus and the Somaly Mam Foundation photographs
used with permission and gratitude

“Revolution”
from “Prelude in G minor, op. 23, no. 5”
composed by Sergei Rachmaninoff
performed by Chloe Flower
piano arrangements by Chloe Flower
drum programming by Tim & Bob
additional arrangements by Kenneth “Babyface” Edmonds
produced by Kenneth “Babyface” Edmonds and Tim & Bob
copyright 2012 by Chloe Flower and Kenneth “Babyface” Edmonds

with great appreciation for our entire all-volunteer crew—and their talent, dedication, professionalism and time
© copyright 2012 by The Lamp Project
all rights reserved

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